FAQ

Answers on FAQ 


What is "Impact mode"?

Strike mode is a bonus for daily workouts and is activated on the fifth day of continuous workouts for solving chess problems. That is, if you entered and solved problems for 4 days in a row, on the 5th day you will turn on the first day of Strike mode and for the correct solution of problems you will begin to receive 30% more rating, in this mode you will be able to increase your rating much faster by site.

If suddenly on some day you did not solve the problem, the Impact mode will reset to zero and it will take 4 days in a row to solve problems again for it to turn on.

Daily practice will improve your game very quickly, so by practicing in Strike mode you will grow faster in chess.


Why are different tasks given a different amount of rating?

The reward (and the cost of a mistake) in each problem depends on several factors - your current rating, the difficulty of the problem, the number of moves in the problem, whether Strike mode is enabled or not.

So, for a beginner (rating 1000-1400) there will be one victory price, and for a player with a rating of 1400-1600 it will be different. Also for a mistake in a problem, if you have a high rating and you make a mistake in a simple problem, you will lose more rating than if a beginner was mistaken, and vice versa, if a beginner solves a difficult problem, he will receive more rating than an experienced player.

The cost of victory and the cost of error are calculated for you immediately, when you open the problem, you can immediately see how much you will earn for the solution or lose in case of a wrong move.

Sophisticated rating calculation allows you to maintain a balance of player ratings on the portal and brings the conditions closer to real life, where you cannot get a high grade by solving only simple one-step tasks.




Is it possible to find out the history of this project. How did it all begin and develop? Where did the idea come from?

About how it all began, about what the creators of the project and the project think - see the following video: